ANTIPHONARY OF BANGOR PDF

Terminology[ edit ] Alternative terms for Antiphonary are Antiphonal or Antiphony. In current usage, Antiphonary refers more narrowly to books containing the chants for the Divine Office in distinction to the [ Gradual Graduale or more rarely antiphonarium Missarum , which contains the antiphons used for the Mass. Other English equivalents for antiphonary are antiphonar still in reputable use and antiphoner considered obsolete by some English lexicographers, but still sometimes used in the early 20th century. The word Antiphonary had in the earlier Middle Ages sometimes a more general, sometimes a more restricted meaning.

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An ancient Latin manuscript , supposed to have been originally written at Bangor Ireland. The codex, found by Muratori in the Ambrosian Library at Milan , and named by him the "Antiphonary of Bangor" "Antiphonarium Benchorense" , was brought to Milan from Bobbio with many other books by Cardinal Federigo Borromeo when he founded the Ambrosian Library in Bobbio, which is situated in a gorge of the Apennines thirty-seven miles north-east of Genoa , was founded by St.

Columbanus , a disciple of St. Comgal, founder of the great monastery at Bangor on the south side of Belfast Lough in the county of Down.

Columbanus died at Bobbio and was buried there in This establishes at once a connection between Bobbio and Bangor, and an examination of the contents of the codex placed it beyond all doubt that it was originally compiled in Bangor and brought thence to Bobbio , not, however, in the time of St.

There is in the codex a hymn entitled "ymnum sancti Congilli abbatis nostri", and he is referred to in it as "nostri patroni Comgilli sancti". Again there is a list of fifteen abbots , beginning with Comgal and ending with Cronanus who died in ; the date of the compilation, therefore, may be referred to Muratori, however, is careful to state in his preface that the codex, though very old, and in part mutilated, may have been a copy made at Bobbio , by some of the local monks there, from the original service book.

It is written, as regards the orthography, the form of the letters, and the dotted ornamentation of the capital letters, in "the Scottic style", but this, of course, may have been done by Gaelic monks at Bobbio.

The actual bearer of the codex from Bangor is generally supposed and stated to have been St. Dungal, who left Ireland early in the ninth century, acquired great celebrity on the Continent, and probably retired to Bobbio towards the close of his life. He bequeathed his books to "the blessed Columbanus", i. The antiphonary , however, cannot be identified with any of the books named in the catalogue of the books bequeathed by Dungal, as given by Muratori Antiquitatis Italicae Medii Aevi, Milan , , III, Here only a summary can be given of the contents of the codex to which the name of "Antiphonary" will be found to be not very applicable: 1 six canticles; 2 twelve metrical hymns ; 3 sixty-nine collects for use at the canonical hours ; 4 special collects; 5 seventy anthems, or versicles; 6 the Creed; 7 the Pater Noster.

The most famous item in the contents is the venerable Eucharistic hymn "Sancti venite Christi corpus sumite", which is not found in any other ancient text. It was sung at the Communion of the clergy and is headed, "Ymnum quando comonicarent sacerdotes". A text of the hymn from the old manuscript Of Bobbio, with a literal translation, is given in "Essays on the Discipline and Constitution of the Early Irish Church," p.

The Creed in this codex differs in its wording from all other forms known to exist. It is in substance the original Creed of Nicaea. It does not contain the ex Patre Filioque procedit, but merely states the homoousia of the three Persons of the Holy Trinity. About this page APA citation. Ua Clerigh, A. Antiphonary of Bangor. In The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Ua Clerigh, Arthur. New York: Robert Appleton Company, This article was transcribed for New Advent by Susan Birkenseer.

Ecclesiastical approbation. Nihil Obstat. Remy Lafort, S. Farley, Archbishop of New York. Contact information. The editor of New Advent is Kevin Knight. My email address is webmaster at newadvent. Dedicated to the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

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Antiphonary of Bangor

The codex, found by Muratori in the Ambrosian Library at Milan, and named by him the "Antiphonary of Bangor" "Antiphonarium Benchorense" , was brought to Milan from Bobbio with many other books by Cardinal Federigo Borromeo when he founded the Ambrosian Library in Bobbio, which is situated in a gorge of the Apennines thirty-seven miles north-east of Genoa, was founded by St. Columbanus, a disciple of St. Comgal, founder of the great monastery at Bangor on the south side of Belfast Lough in the county of Down.

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The antiphonary of Bangor: an early Irish manuscript in the Ambrosian library at Milan

Please contact for permission for any commercial use. Tag: antiphonary of bangor About Celtic Prayers The Celts he Celts were a people and a culture, and they seem to have been in central Europe as early as B. Sometimes called the Hallstatt Culture. By B. The reason we associate Celts with Ireland, Scotland and Wales is that is where Celtic identity remained after Europe was dominated by the Roman Empire. Celtic revivals of cultural identity have come and gone and come again in those countries. Christian missionaries came into Britain after Christianity was decreed a religio licita, a legal religion, and also the religion of the Roman Empire, with a peak of missionary activity in the fifth century.

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